Hydei vs Melanogaster Culture

Discussion in 'Food & Feeding' started by Aurust, Feb 10, 2020.

  1. Aurust

    Aurust Member

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    I have a culture of both types of flies and it always seems like the hydei are struggling to produce and last. I know they are slower to reproduce and grow but this is different.

    They always have fewer flies and never really seem to boom. I keep both in deli cups with Repashy Superfly and excelsior. The melanogaster always boom and a culture can last 3-4 weeks while the hydei are lucky to last 3.

    Any tips or ideas on how to get the hydei to last a bit longer and produce better?
     
  2. Justin F

    Justin F Moderator Staff Member

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    Doubling your media helps, we find hydei burn through the typical amount before the first boom but adding extra helps them make it through. Also cutting down on how many flies you start with will help prevent them from choking each other out, we even dump out all the adults once we see larvae. It also helps to avoid using freshly hatching cultures to start new ones with, I cant recall which but one of the sexes hatches later than the other so waiting a week to harvest can lead to a better male to female ratio.
     
  3. indrap

    indrap Member

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    The earlier you use hydei the more likely you are to get just one sex because tbey mature sexually at different rates (don't believe this is true for melanogaster). But both hydei and mels you shouldn't be using the first major boom. When you use a later emergence the population of flies you're choosing is more adapted to culture conditions after the first boom (ie more tolerant to higher ammonia vs early emerges).

    By getting flies from a large first boom you're essentially selecting flies that will have a higher feeding rate, lower efficiency of food utilization (likely impacting their nutritional profile), on top of the aforementioned intolerance to ammonia, all of which play a role in bad cultures that may crash.
     
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