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Discussion in 'Introductions' started by C_Beall, Oct 20, 2016.

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  1. C_Beall

    C_Beall New Member

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    Just trying to get into frogs, experienced with aquariums already. Hoping to learn more and get some frogs.
    1. What genus/species would be good for beginners?
    2. How big of a tank would they need?
    3. What do I need, besides the tank, a light, and fruit flies?
    4. Do you need to keep frogs in groups, or are singletons fine?
    5. Are there any easy, arboreal dart frogs that could be kept in a paludarium (half water, half land)?
     
  2. Ron Jung

    Ron Jung Contributing Member

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    Welcome to Canadart. There is a lot of info here just have to look in the right sections. Vivarium General, Construction and Parts and you can read the others for food and frogs. I am also sure many members here are more than happy to help a beginner out as at one time we were all beginners. Nice to have you aboard and see our family continuing to grow. :)

    Ron.
     
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  3. afterdark

    afterdark Administrator Staff Member

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    Hi there, like Ron said, if you just poke around you should find what you're looking for.

    That said, some good beginner species to research are Dendrobates azureues, Dedrobates leucomelas, or Dendrobates auratus. Many people start out with one of those three, mainly because they are more common, hardier, and larger than many other darts. This makes it easier to watch them for signs of illness or aggression.

    Size of tank can vary as well, some folks are fine with a pair of darts in a 10G tank, and others build huge display tanks into the walls of their homes.

    Please feel free to ask as many questions as you like.

    Thanks, and welcome.carl:)
     
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  4. C_Beall

    C_Beall New Member

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    I saw some people mention false bottoms and drilling the tank, I presume this was for drainage purposes? Is this a necessity, or just something you can do optionally for ease of maintenance?
     
  5. afterdark

    afterdark Administrator Staff Member

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    Yeah, false bottoms can keep your substrate from getting too saturated.

    I haven't ever personally drilled my tanks, but I know lots of folks who have


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. C_Beall

    C_Beall New Member

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    Thanks. What measures do you take to prevent over saturation then?
     
  7. erikm

    erikm Administrator Staff Member

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    Welcome!

    False bottom/drainage layer is definitely necessary. However drilling your tank isn't necessary, but it isn't a bad idea if you know how to do it. I don't drill my tanks. Instead, if I need to remove standing water, I just a small aquarium air tube hose and siphon it out.
     
  8. erikm

    erikm Administrator Staff Member

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    2-3" false bottom or 3-4" of drainage media such as leca (expanded clay balls).
     
  9. erikm

    erikm Administrator Staff Member

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    Quick example photo of one of my vivs. Sorry it's a bit hard to see because its so dark near the bottom of the tank. I have about 3" of large size leca, then window screening, then my substrate.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. C_Beall

    C_Beall New Member

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    So you just stick a sipjon down to the drainage layer and suck out the water? I presume this should be done when you see a visible layer of water in the drainage media?
     
  11. erikm

    erikm Administrator Staff Member

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    Yep I carefully move some substrate away from the corner and put the tube down there. I just drained that viv the other day. About 1cm or so of water that accumulated over 8 or so months.
     
  12. C_Beall

    C_Beall New Member

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    Wow, that seems lower maintenance than I expected. How often is substrate cleaned/replaced? Sorry I'm asking so many questions.
     
  13. C_Beall

    C_Beall New Member

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    Oh, and are dart frogs OK with pools of water, or is there a risk of drowning?
     
  14. erikm

    erikm Administrator Staff Member

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    No worries questions are good. If you have good drainage and microfauna your substrate should last years. You can add new leaf litter every once in a while as that breaks down faster.

    I don't personally care to have pools of water built into my tanks but some people do. Generally it can be problematic if not done correctly. As long as its not too deep and has a slope where the frogs can climb they'll be ok. Caution though!

    I use small cups of water for tadpole deposition throughout. The frogs can easily climb in and out. You can see them in the photo as well.
     
  15. afterdark

    afterdark Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm also in the camp that doesn't generally include standing water in my tanks. I'm with Eric, in that I use film canisters and other small containers to provide tadpole deposition sites.

    One of our members, Phil (greenoasis) designs really great backgrounds and tank accessories that can have those tadpole deposition sites built right into them. I'm still waiting for a big project to get him to make me a monster background. :)
     
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  16. Carlos

    Carlos Contributing Member

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    I myself have some of all 3 methods. Some drilled, some with a "pool" and some without. They all have their pros and cons.
    My smaller vivs I don't add a pool, but in my larger vivs I add a small pool. It makes it much easier to siphon water out if you ever need too. I also find that I'll see the frogs hangout by the pool at times. Prob picking out springtails and flies. Just make sure the frogs can't get out and that the water stays fairly shallow.

    [​IMG]

    Here's a picture of one while I was still planting it and about to add leaf litter.
    [​IMG]

    Here's another example.
    [​IMG]

    I don't not have any running water in any of my vivs.

    Just look at members builds on the site and do what you think might look best for your viv and have fun with it.

    Just my 2 cents


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  17. Ron Jung

    Ron Jung Contributing Member

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    I have one large tank with running water and a water fall down a curved piece of cork bark very cool looking but drops to a pool only 1/2" deep with 3" of gravel below where I grow aquatic plants emersed like amazon sword out of water but roots in water. Just remember dart frogs are not good swimmers so if the water is deeper than they are have a couple spots in there where they can climb up onto to rest and make sure the edges are easy for them to get up and out.

    Hey Carlos looks like it will be an awesome tank when fully planted and grown in. Nice job.
    Erik nice looking tank too like the full background.

    Ron.
     
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  18. mystah

    mystah Legendary Member

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    Welcome to the Board
    Great questions so far, as Ron mentioned you should be able to find most answers written in old posts on the Forum...if you are unclear as you can see many people are here to offer some advice.

    like Carlos I have pools in some of my tanks and not in others. All of my tanks are drilled and drain below the False bottom
     

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