Featured Ethan’s Ranitomeya amazonica care sheet

Discussion in 'Member Care Sheets' started by Ethan A, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. Ethan A

    Ethan A Contributing Member

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    -I have kept these frogs for four years-
    Note: Previously knows as R. ventrimaculata these frogs are now referred to R. amazonica.


    Introduction:

    These beautiful little frogs are arguably some of the easiest thumbnails to keep and are often recommended as an introductory species to Ranitomeya. Striking colours, prolific breeders, great in groups, and hardy nature makes this frog an interesting and rewarding species to work with.

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    Colour and pattern variation is noticeable between individuals and stripes range from yellow to reddish orange in colour; I find the majority of them to be a medium orange. Ranitomeya amazonica hails from the upper amazon in the vicinity of Iquitos, Peru, and possibly even overlaps with the similar looking lowland striped morph of its sister species, R. variabilis.

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    [Species locality information courtesy of dendrobates.org]
    [Map data: Google, Landsat]


    Behaviour:

    R. amazonica is a shy frog and the keeper will soon become aware of that! That being said, they will allow you to observe them, most often in the morning or after some time away from the vivarium. Keeping humidity high and the terrarium well planted should help embolden the frogs, but apart from that their nature is relatively antisocial, but not reclusive. These frogs are also very quick and like most thumbnails, good at hiding, so be vigilant when removing items and maintaining the vivarium.


    Parameters:

    Temperature and humidity should be the similar to most other Ranitomeya species; I have success keeping them at 22-25ºC, with humidity around 80%.


    Housing:

    Although they are small frogs (even for Ranitomeya), they will appreciate the space you give them. I keep a group of 5 in an 18’x18’x24’ vivarium which I believe is a good size. I find they do spend a lot of time in the lower levels of the terrarium during the day but also frequently climb, so a vivarium that provides both floor and vertical space would be well used. Avoid water features in small and medium sized vivaria due to the constraint on floor space and potential hazards (drowning frogs, reduced amount of food items, etc).

    I would suggest 15-gallon aquarium with ample usable space for a trio to be sufficient, but obviously the bigger the better.

    Top opening vivariums or deeper front opening vivariums (more than 12’) will reduce the chance of an animal jumping out (speaking from experience!)

    A densely planted vivarium is often recommended for this frog, as a notable characteristic is its shy nature. An abundance of leaf litter and plant growth helps these frogs feel more comfortable and consequently allows more viewing opportunity. Often I see them perched on broad leaves, so I would recommend sturdy plants such as philodendrons, bromeliads, and begonias as foliage.

    Due to the prolific breeders that R. amazonica can be, if overpopulation is a concern I would suggest limiting bromeliads and instead opting for film canisters as water sources.

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    Breeding:

    Females lay eggs below the waterline in bromeliads or film canisters; I often find between 3-4 eggs per clutch although clutch size ranges from 2-6 eggs. Frogs raised in vivaria are especially small, so I prefer removing eggs when possible and raising the frogs outside the vivarium for larger and easier to raise froglets.

    I strongly recommend springtails for this species as the offspring will be much easier to raise with an abundance of small food items.

    [Egg clutch size from dendrobates.org]

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    Eggs at 5 days of development
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    Feeding:

    This species poses no difference when it comes to feeding than other Ranitomeya species. As with all other frogs, fresh and properly stored supplements are vital to the animal’s health and reproduction. I strongly recommend the use of a calcium+ supplement every feeding and a vitamin A supplement once a month. Adults and subadults readily take melanogaster fruit flies, and froglets should be offered springtails and dusted flies.


    Sexing:

    This species is pretty easy to sex: females are noticeably more plump than males. I find males can usually be spotted when calling which makes the job easy.
     
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  2. erikm

    erikm Administrator Staff Member

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    Fantastic job with our first care sheet submission! Featured :)
     
    Ethan A likes this.
  3. GermanEdam

    GermanEdam Member

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    Perfect care sheet!
     
  4. Ethan A

    Ethan A Contributing Member

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    Thank you!
     

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