Benedictopia... vivarium build

Discussion in 'Vivarium General' started by 41714049, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. Epiphile

    Epiphile Contributing Member

    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    231
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    I'd guess 12 nozzles (my leaky old cabinet has three nozzles per section, and these do a really good job of keeping things humid), with room for expansion? I guess it depends on whether you were planning on keeping things moist with the system or just keeping the humidity up, which is considerably different.

    120 CFM seems like a good place to start, especially if they're strategically placed. I might go higher, in fact. Again as a point of reference, I probably have 60-70 CFM of movement in each section of my cabinet (2 60mm fans), though I wish my fan placement was a bit better.
     
  2. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    Thanks for the patience. As stated, updates will be slow… sorry. So, here is what has been added thus far. I have drilled two 4” duct holes for the ventilation, one 2” hole for the 1.5” drain bulkhead, and one 2” hole for the 1.5” humidifier outlet. The first 4” duct (intake) will have the main 4” run within the base of the background with 3” vertical branches (6-8 of them) built into the background that will intake air for air circulation. The second 4” duct will be within the canopy and will run along the top front of the canopy, it will have 4 vertical branches that will terminate at 2” 45-degree ends that will exhaust air back into the tank. The difference between the size and number of inlet vs. outlet ducts should allow for a nice breeze within the tank while making sure there is no “vacuum” effect on the intakes. The humidifier outlet is for adding an ultrasonic humidifier and is made from a 1.5" bulkhead with a ABS DWV 1.5" Trap Adapter screwed into it to allow attaching of standard 1.5" pipe to be used to extend the outlet through the background. The drain bulkhead is a 1.5" standard bulkhead with a matching strainer. I prefer an inlet near the base of the tank rather than the top as when it fills with fog I feel it looks more natural. Also, with the air movement in the tank the humid air should get around the tank easily. I have also been able to complete 2 layers of RubberGuard Pro. Hope you enjoy!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    Thanks for the advice... what amount of air movement would you suggest (total) for the tank?
     
  4. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    Oh... and the bulkheads were sanded and will be installed with the lips of the bulkheads sandwiched between layers of the waterproofing membrane... i tested and it bonds like glue to sanded ABS and PVC. This will essentially make the bulkheads a part if the entire membrane.
     
  5. Epiphile

    Epiphile Contributing Member

    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    231
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    It's tough to say... you have an ingenius method for getting the air to and fro without anything being visible. I feel like you've done your homework, and will probably be fine with what you've planned. If you're running 12V fans, can you plan to run them at lower voltage? That way maybe you could go up or down on the voltage after the fact and not have to switch out the fans.
     
  6. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    I am currently looking at a 120v inline bathroom exhaust that connects to 4" ducting. I am trying to source dimmable models at this time
     
    Epiphile likes this.
  7. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

    Messages:
    2,734
    Likes Received:
    318
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Brantford, Ontario
  8. Epiphile

    Epiphile Contributing Member

    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    231
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    Can you tell if it's dimmable, Glenn? It doesn't say anything specifically.
     
  9. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

    Messages:
    2,734
    Likes Received:
    318
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Brantford, Ontario
    I'm not sure, but there's one way to find out. ;) Grab one, hook it up to a dimmer switch, if it fires great, if not you can return it.
     
    Epiphile likes this.
  10. frogfreak

    frogfreak Legendary Member

    Messages:
    2,734
    Likes Received:
    318
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Brantford, Ontario
    Epiphile likes this.
  11. Scarloc

    Scarloc Contributing Member

    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    22
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Milton
    Just try it if not return it to the depot.
     
  12. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    frogfreak and Epiphile like this.
  13. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    OK... so layer 3 is done... reinforcing fabric was added to all corners and joints within the tank. This was done by putting a layer of the rubberguard, soaked a strip of the fabric in rubberguard, pressing it into the joints (removing all air bubbles), then painting another layer over top. The 2 bulkheads are also added, the bulkeads were painted with a layer of rubberguard underneath the lip, then painted a layer around the hole of the bulkhead, installed the bulkhead (extra rubberguard squeezed out), then painted another layer over the top of the lip to essentially seal the bulkhead within the layers of rubberguard. Note the blue that you see is masking tape to protect the important parts such as the strainer and the joint where the pipes will need to be glued into.

    [​IMG]

    If you look closely you can see the dull outline of the reinforcing fabric underneath the third layer.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
    frogfreak and Epiphile like this.
  14. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    OK, so here is what I am thinking for the air flow, a NuTone ILF250 inline fan (6" with reducers to 4" - there will be some loss of CFM). This fan would then be installed so that it plugs into a GFI outlet using a standard power cord. This would allow for easy removal for cleaning / maintenance. The fan runs at 250CFM max. I would then have a solid state fan speed controller inline on the power cord to control the speed. Would this be enough movement then?

    http://www.nutone.com/products/product/baa2539f-6ed0-49c7-9f38-89db0ae74fda

    In addition below is a cad drawing with labels added to describe the way the top of the tank will be (current revision). The top will be all glass except for the ventilation area.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    OK... so finally finished all 6 layers of waterproofing... I'll spare you more pictures of this as it looks the same. Letting it vulcanize for a few weeks... says 1 week but that is outdoors in the sunlight. Now I have started on the background. The base of the background will be rigid foam. There were channels cut in it to fit my ventilation intake ducts. I varied the heights of the intakes to make it more natural (hopefully) by the time I finish.

    [​IMG]

    Then I built the ducts. I was going to do PVC originally, but opted on ABS for the simple reason of colour (easy to hide). Since there is no water that runs through it it shouldn't leach anything. Outside the tank I will continue with PVC. The ducts are made out of 4" main pipe, 3" risers that end on a wye (facing down to again help hide the intakes and also to minimize any water intake from the misting nozzles), and the wye is caped with a 3" clean out cap. The intakes will have screens put in later that will be replaceable (in case of damage or deterioration) and made from a ring of 3" pipe that fits into the end of the wye. Note in the picture the main 4" duct is laying on a 2x4 to raise it. This is to align it with the pipe in the tank and also allows the pipes to be tilted back slightly to match the slope the background will have.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Once in place, started to GS the spaces to essentially glue everything together, and seal the holes.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Epiphile and frogfreak like this.
  16. Epiphile

    Epiphile Contributing Member

    Messages:
    794
    Likes Received:
    231
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    This is shaping up to be one of the most comprehensive builds I've ever seen. Great work, Jan!
     
    Mellywell likes this.
  17. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    Thanks! I know updates are slow... but eventually I will get there.
     
  18. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    OK so power outages form the ice storm aside, all frogs are still alive and did some work last week. I will post pictures again soon on updates. I have currently outlined my lighting design / layout for my custom LED light. I will be building two 32" x 10" fixtures with the following layout (lines between the star LED's are the wires):

    upload_2013-12-26_21-18-18.png

    BLUE = CREE XP-G Cool White LED
    upload_2013-12-26_21-27-45.png
    YELLOW = CREE XP-G Neutral White LED
    upload_2013-12-26_21-28-44.png
    RED = CREE XP-G Warm White LED
    upload_2013-12-26_21-29-42.png

    The system will run on 7 separate channels powered by individual drivers. This will allow running at approximately 85% capacity on each driver.

    The channels will be controlled so that during sunrise the warm channel fades in first, then the neutral, then the cool. It would be reversed for sunset. The middle cool blue channel will also double as a moonlight channel but will run at a highly dimmed level. I am using cool white instead of the blue led for night to better imitate the true colour of moonlight. If I do not like it, I can always change the programming or add another set of moonlight LEDs on a separate channel. The housing will be a giant aluminum heat sink with fans.

    This fixture will have the potential lumen output of over 34,000 @ approximately 430W... and there will be 2 of them. Hopefully this will be enough (Drew / Aaron can chime in?) light. If it is too much, I always have the controller and can lower the intensity.

    Any concerns about my colour ratios? any suggestions? I am also looking at using 60-degree lenses to focus more light downwards.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2013
  19. Drew

    Drew Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,759
    Likes Received:
    774
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Burlington
    i would go lens less on cool white in the middle and 80 degrees on the neutral and warm to diffuse the light. Looks like tons of light
     
  20. 41714049

    41714049 Contributing Member

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Prince Edward County, Ontario
    Thanks for the suggestion Drew!
     

Social Sharing